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Michael Loadenthal

School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, George Mason University

Michael Loadenthal is an anarchist organizer and academic insurgent stranded between Cincinnati, OH and Washington, DC. He received a dual BA in International Peace and Conflict Resolution, and Women’s and Gender Studies (American University, 2006) and completed a Master’s degree in Terrorism Studies at the Centre for the Study of Terrorism and Political Violence (University of St. Andrews, 2010). Since 2011, Loadenthal has taught “Terrorism and Political Violence” at Georgetown University, and serves as a doctoral Fellow at the School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution (George Mason University). Loadenthal’s work has been published in a variety of journals including "Critical Studies on Terrorism", "Radical Criminology", "Anarchist Developments in Cultural Studies", "Journal of Critical Animal Studies", "Theory in Action", and the "Journal of Terrorism Research".

Email: michael.loadenthal@gmail.com

Related Articles
Jah People: the cultural hybridity of white Rastafarians. By M. Loadenthal

Abstract: For more than half a century, the African-based Rastafarian movement has existed and thrived.  Since the early 1930s, Rastafari has developed, changed and gained enough supporters to be considered “one of the most popular Afro-Caribbean religions of the late twentieth century. According to a survey conducted in 1997, there are over one million practicing Rastafarians worldwide as well as over two million sympathizers. Rastafarians are concentrated in the Caribbean, though members of this diverse movement have settled in significant numbers all throughout the world.  At present, there are large Rastafarian communities in New York, Miami, Washington DC, Philadelphia, Chicago, Huston, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Boston and New Haven as well as many large cities in Canada, Europe, South America and Africa. While Rastafari has maintained much of its original flavour, migration, globalization and a reinterpretation of philosophical dogma has created a space for white people to join this typically black movement.

Keywords: hybridity, Rastafarians, religions, migration, political movement.

Michael Loadenthal

School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, George Mason University